Jobs And Over Aged Applicants

On March 18, 2014, in job hunting, by Rogue Recruiter

Though some employers would prefer a younger workforce, the older applicants still have a wide variety of career choices to choose from.  Employers are starting to see the potential of older and much-experienced applicants as can be seen by the statistics below:

In Australia, Bureau of Statistics showed that between the period of August of 1989 to that of August of 2003, the workforce aged 15-24 lost more than 380,000 jobs to older workers.

Aside from the fact that most of Australia’s younger generation became full-time students, employers favored the older applicants.

In Netherlands on the other hand (by December of 2000), over 500,000 thousand of their employees are 55 years old and above. This figure had been increasing steadily since 1995.

To have a head start from the younger applicants, one has to take into consideration the following:

1. In writing one’s resume, put more weight in highlighting the accomplishments without necessarily bragging about it.

  • Lists of accomplishments and the previous posts you have held work in favor older workers over younger younger applicants who may not even have any experience on the same field.
  • An individual’s employment history receives as much scrutiny as the applicant itself. While employers tend to look for gaps or lapses of time when the applicant has been unemployed, they also tend to focus on the length of service one had rendered for their previous employers.
  • Frequent change of work (usually within very short time frames) can be alarming for prospective employers and that can work for them and against younger workers especially since the recession started in 2007.

2. Read and enroll in programs that will refresh your knowledge on certain fields especially if engaged in professional sectors. This will keep you individual abreast of the latest trend in such fields.

3. Search the Internet for vacancies. A lot of agencies place ads on the net that advertise.

4. Jobs that do not usually look into the age of the applicant are the following:

  1. Professional work where a deep specialization is required (i.e. Doctors) In many fields, experience is the basic determinant of being hired.
  2. Lectures or speaking engagements. Speakers that are invited to discuss certain topics do not really have an age requirement. Rather, qualification focuses more on first hand knowledge and experience.
  3. Writers. Writing novels, plays or children’s books are one of those professions whose only requirement is good writing skills. Also, you may be able to work from your own home – a plus factor for those in their advanced years.

 

 

Interviewing Skills: A Key To Anyone’s Future.

On March 6, 2014, in job hunting, by Rogue Recruiter

So when was the last time you interviewed? How did it go for you? My guess is that it went poorly for you and that is no slam on you personally its just that most people fear interviews and lose a lot of jobs as a result. I read something like 85% of people in the work force right now had to go through 5-6 interviews before they landed the job that they are in right now. Now there may be multiple reasons for this figure but let me tell you the overwhelming majority of people, if they knew the secrets of successful interviewing skills would land the job they want every time. Instead of getting turned down, they would be turning down job offers.

So isn’t it just a personality thing? Well yes and no. Personality certainly goes a long way in carrying a conversation and presenting yourself in a good light, but very few people have this endearing personality. There are a lot more people who land jobs than people with gregarious personalities–and that is because they now how to interview. Yes, interviewing skills can definitely be and should be learned. So how do people learn?

Well a lot of people have learned interviewing skills through trial and error. The more you do something the better you get at it (usually!). But who wants to learn like this…I mean there are few things that are more painful than getting a rejection letter. Also how fun are interviews in general? Basically most people want to avoid them entirely! Then, wouldn’t it be great if you could learn what makes a successful interview from the eyes of the potential employer? Wouldn’t it be nice to go into an interview with the mindset that you are evaluating them and not the other way around?

Another important thing to remember is that this goes much deeper than learning interviewing skills or tricks. In fact the training that makes you good at interviewing, makes you successful in life. Communication for instance is a fundamental part of success whether it be social confidence, or ability to manage, or network…and on and on.

Learning (and I 100% guarantee that you can learn this stuff) interviewing skills is profitable for anyone from the fresh graduate to the seasoned business man. It is also great for you life outside of work including parenting, dating, marriage–you name it! So don’t wait any longer to get this valuable part of your success under your control!

 

Job Interviews: Prepare Questions In Advance

On February 17, 2014, in job hunting, by Rogue Recruiter

An interview almost invariably closes with the potential employer asking if you have any questions. Often an applicant will ask for clarification on benefits -insurance, vacation time, etc. While these are obviously important for you to know, they plant a seed in the interviewer’s mind that maybe you are more interested in what the job can do for you than in how you can help the employer.

Try to have three or four questions ready to ask that demonstrate your interest in the company and your desire to be a problem-solver.

If you have been able to do some research, trot out a question or two that came to mind. If you have been able to come up with some ideas that relate to the problem, throw them out to see how the employer reacts.

If you have been able to identify some trends or problems in the industry, ask how that is going to affect the company and what they are doing to deal with it. Show your concern about industry developments and what that may bode for the future.

If some current challenges have been brought up earlier in the interview, ask for clarification and more detail.   If you have networked with the “newly departed”, you will know where all  their pain-points are and should be bale to ask questions around those issues and bring up examples where you have solved those issues in the past. 

The more the interviewer interacts with you as if your concerns are mutual, and that possible solutions are something you could consider together, the more you will be seen as a valuable future member of his team and the more likely you will be asked to join that team.  Remember, no one gets out of bed in the morning and decides “today’s a good day to hire someone!”, no they get up and say “oh my goodness how am I gong to solve XYZ problem?”.  You, my friend want to be their solution to that problem!

 

Job Applications – Common Interview Questions Part 2

On February 11, 2014, in job hunting, by Rogue Recruiter

What, would you say, is your greatest weakness?

No one likes admitting to weaknesses, but this is a favorite interview question, and one you need to be prepared for.

This is not the time to confess your deepest secrets or expose embarrassing mistakes you have made in previous jobs. You should choose an area in which you don’t have quite as much experience or confidence as you’d like – something which you will have the opportunity to work on in the job for which you are applying.

It should not be something which you are expected to have already mastered, but something which will be useful for the post and can be developed over time. If you will be expected to give regular presentations, for example, saying that you find this difficult won’t go down well. However, if this isn’t expected at your level, but would be once you’ve moved up the ladder, you might say that you find it a bit nerve wracking and could do with more practice.

Check the job description and person specification for essential and desirable skills and be sure to choose something which is non-essential. It could be that you are unfamiliar with a particular software package which only plays a small part in the job.

Once you have decided on your weakness, be sure to emphasize your willingness to improve and your awareness that you will have the opportunity to do so in the job.

And your greatest strength?

Many people have much more difficulty finding a strength than admitting to a weakness, but if you are asked to supply the latter, there is a good chance you’ll be asked for a strength as well. So be sure to prepare something.

Which aspects of your present job are you naturally good at? Is there anything about your work which has been praised by managers or commented on by co-workers?

If you are just leaving college, which skills did you develop as a student or in other activities such as voluntary work – being a team player, researching information, communication skills?

You should also relate your chosen strength to the job you’re applying for. What is it that the interviewers want and that you know you can deliver?

Your strength needs to be based on reality and should be strong. This is your chance to shine, to bring your best qualities and abilities to the attention of the interviewers. Saying you’re quite good at working in a team won’t cut any ice. You must illustrate your team-working skills with an impressive example, something the panel will remember when they come to make their decision.

Preparation is the key to answering interview questions – make sure you do it.

 

© Waller Jamison 2005

 

 

Job Applications – Common Interview Questions Part 1

On February 10, 2014, in job hunting, by Rogue Recruiter

Questions about your present, or most recent, job can be tricky and if you aren’t careful you can ruin your chances by making negative or undiplomatic comments. So make sure you are prepared.

In an ideal world, we’d all get on brilliantly with the boss and our colleagues – and we’d love every minute of the job. If this were the case, it’s very unlikely we’d ever look for another opportunity. In the real world, the reason you want to leave a job may well be that you don’t get on with the boss or your immediate supervisor, or that the routine has become mind-numbingly boring.

However terrible your present job, the interview is not the time to discuss it. You must be professional and don’t forget, if you are offered the position, the people interviewing you will be your boss and colleagues and they don’t want to work with someone who will complain about them at the first opportunity.

What questions might you be asked about your recent work history? How do you get on with your boss? And how about your colleagues? Why do you want to leave? What do you dislike about your job?

Let’s start with the first two.

How do you get on with your boss or your colleagues?

Whatever the reality, you must give a positive answer. You could say, for example, that you have a good working relationship and that you have always found your boss helpful and supportive; there is a good team spirit and you get on well with your colleagues or that you work together effectively. If you are asked for specific faults in your boss or co-workers, don’t be tempted to run anyone down. This question is not about them, it’s about you and your loyalty. So never say anything against anyone you work with or have worked with in the past. If you feel you can’t honestly give any of the above answers, really think about the people you work with and find something positive that you could say about them.

Why do you want to leave your present job?

You need to think carefully about this one, as employers don’t want to think that you hop from job to job, get bored quickly or are more interested in your after work activities. If there is an obvious reason, such as the end of your contract, redundancy, or you are moving to a different area, say so. Many people are reluctant to say that they have been made redundant, but remember that it’s the post which has been redundant, not you.

What do you say if the truth is that you are bored to death in your present post?

Think carefully about why you are applying for the job in question. What do you think it will give you that your present job does not? Money and longer holidays are the wrong answers. If these are the real reasons, you may well end up just as bored in this job. Take a close look at what the company has to offer. Will it give you an opportunity which is lacking in your present post, for example, to develop existing skills or learn new ones? Or will you have the chance to use specific qualifications or abilities, such as foreign languages, which aren’t needed in your present post? Is there the possibility of advancement, receiving mentoring or taking on new responsibilities which you are unable to do now?

What do you dislike about your job?

Again, caution is needed. If you say that you specifically dislike something, it may be a part of the new job, which would indicate you didn’t read the job description properly and that you’ll dislike this job just as much.

You could say that you enjoy your job but feel ready for something more challenging or that you have learned a great deal but are now ready to move to a post in which you will have more responsibility.

The bottom line – before applying for a new job, make sure you can give positive reasons for leaving the old one and clear motivation for choosing the new one – and never criticize any of your co-workers.

 

© Waller Jamison 2005